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Keeping passengers informed is critical for the modern airport – improving passenger experience, passenger flow and subsequently airport operations efficiency.

When surroundings are unfamiliar and time is critical, people rely on display systems to guide them to their desired destination. Sophisticated flight information systems have to take existing language barriers into consideration and must provide accurate and complete information at all relevant locations. They have to be easily configurable, must run automatically and should be aesthetically pleasing.

ADB SAFEGATE's Safedock FleX is a new generation A-VDGS designed with safety and availability in mind, and is our latest offering within the Safedock family.

A Building Management System (BMS) is a computer system installed in a building that will communicate with the building's equipment. Allowing its owner to monitor and control its installations and systems, such as air conditioning, heating, ventilation, lighting, alarms, access control or energy supply management systems (electricity, gas, solar panels, smart meters etc.)

How does it work?

Daily, building management systems (BMS) allows to :

  • Control the different systems of the building (via the measurement of the HVAC, the air quality, the humidity level, the noise pollution, etc.)

  • Manage the energy consumption of a building

  • Monitor in real-time and schedule operations

  • Set up management of breakdowns and alarms

  • Produce data reports

 

Building Management Systems allows operators to optimise their equipment's use and have a global vision of the performance of their building.

for more information  please follow  https://mepacademy.com/basic-hvac-controls/ 

Conventional fire alarm systems vs. addressable fire alarm systems

Two types of fire alarm systems commonly found in commercial buildings are addressable systems and conventional systems. The main difference in these two systems is how the field devices communicate with the fire alarm panel.  

Conventional systems were the first fire alarm system that came to the market. Addressable systems are newer and more advanced.

Wiring

 Conventional systems have zones on them, which are basically just circuits. Conversely, the fire alarm panels of addressable systems actually communicate over a communication circuit with each individual field device.

In other words, with addressable systems there is one wire that connects all devices to the fire alarm control panel whereas with conventional systems there is a different wire for each device and each wire connects to the fire alarm control panel.

As a result, addressable systems require less cabling than conventional systems since each detector has its own unique address.

Location detection

With conventional fire alarm panels, there will be multiple devices on a zone, so if any of the devices on that zone go into alarm, you’ll get an alarm at the panel that will say “Zone Alarm.” It will also tell you what zone, as they’re numbered. This means that if an alarm comes in, it will tell you the area of the building that the alarm is in, but not a specific location since it could be any of the devices on that circuit. You would then have to walk around in that area looking at the devices to try and determine which one caused the alarm.

Addressable systems allow you to set an address on the field device, normally a 3-digit number, and then tell the panel what and where that device is located. If you get an alarm, you will see something like: “Alarm Smoke Detector (Address: 023) 1st Floor Hall at Room 102.” These systems will provide a specific location where the alarm and what type of device caused the alarm. This is a big help in response times for the fire department or the customer. It also gives you the ability to individually program each device so if you have one smoke detector and one duct detector right next to each other, you can program one to send an alarm and the other to just send a supervisory and not set of the horns and strobes. On a conventional panel, every device on the same circuit would report the same.

The fire alarm control panel on an addressable system receives information and status reports from each device and indicates its exact location if there is smoke or fire.

Cost

Conventional fire alarm systems cost less to purchase but actually cost more to install due to the extensive wiring involved with these systems. It takes more time and more wires to install conventional systems.

Addressable fire alarm systems are more advanced from a functionality standpoint but cost less to install. Addressable systems can also be more cost-efficient in the long run when you consider the accuracy of these systems at detecting fires and therefore preventing fire damage. These systems are also less likely to signal false alarms, a costly mistake.

Functionality

Looking at pure functionality, addressable fire alarm panels are simply more advanced and therefore allow for more control and flexibility. These types of systems are even known as “intelligent” fire alarm systems. They are also more reliable than conventional fire alarm panels when it comes to false alarms.

This isn’t to say that conventional fire alarm systems are not effective; just in some ways limited when it comes to the scope of protection they can offer.

What type of fire alarm system is right for my building?

Conventional systems are still used for very small applications or for customers who don’t want to upgrade, but they have serious limitations as to their abilities to protect larger buildings. Addressable systems are generally “safer” systems as they have to ability to decipher and communicate more detailed information to the control panel, and therefore increase speed and accuracy of fire extinguishment. First responders need as much as information as possible when responding to a fire alarm. Addressable fire alarm systems provide the exact location of a fire in a building, which can save lives, time, and money.

Choosing a fire protection company

When looking for a company to install or inspect your fire alarm system, knowledge and experience are everything, but the customer experience should matter too. Fire Systems, Inc. can install, repair, and maintain your building’s fire alarm system. We even offer fire alarm monitoring. By choosing one company to handle all aspects of your fire alarm system, you’re getting an extra layer of protection and convenience that many other fire protection or security companies simply cannot offer.

Fire Systems offers 24-hour emergency service and 24/7 monitoring for your fire alarm system. We also provide training in the proper use and maintenance of your system so everyone will be prepared to respond appropriately in an emergency situation. When you call Fire Systems.

When it comes to electricity, there are two types: high voltage and low voltage. 

Both have unique purposes and forms of electricity, but they have different applications. For example, high voltage is excellent for powering large devices, while low voltage is better suited for smaller ones. This is one of the key differences between high and low voltage.

In this guide, we’ll break down the pros and cons of each type of electricity and help you learn more 

First, what is high voltage?

 

High voltage is a form of electricity with higher potential energy than low voltage. 

It's typically used to power large devices, like industrial machinery or street lights. The downside of high voltage is that it can be dangerous if not handled correctly. That's why it's crucial to have proper safety measures in place if you're working with high voltage. High voltage is also more expensive to produce than low voltage.

Second, what is low voltage?

 

Low voltage is a form of electricity with lower potential energy than high voltage. 

It typically powers smaller devices, like electronic devices or appliances. The upside of low voltage is that it's less dangerous than high voltage. However, the downside is that it can't power large devices as effectively as high voltage.

What are the main differences between high and low voltage?

Let’s explore more of the differences between high and low voltage so you can decide which type of electricity is best for your application. 

High voltage is the way to go if you need to power large devices. But if you're only powering small devices, low voltage is required. Here are the main differences between the two:

Voltage Ranges

We all know that electricity can be dangerous– even low voltage. 

Low voltage ranges from 0 to 50 volts, while high voltage ranges from 1,000 to 500,000 volts. That's a big difference! And it's important to know which type of electricity you're dealing with because they can both be dangerous in different ways. For example, low voltage is more likely to cause shocks, while high voltage can cause severe burns.

So if you're ever working with electricity, make sure you know the voltage range before starting!

Applications

Low and high voltage are used in a variety of industries.

For example, low voltage is often used in automotive, marine, and aircraft applications. It can also be used in telecommunications, audio/video, security systems, and household appliances, such as hairdryers and vacuum cleaners.

High voltage is used in power generation, transmission, and distribution applications. In addition, it can be used in electrical equipment, such as motors, generators, transformers, and medical applications, such as X-ray and MRI machines.

Safety measures

Because high voltage can be dangerous, it's essential to have proper safety measures in place if you're working with it. 

Low and high voltage refers to the intensity at which electricity is sent through wires. Low voltage is less likely to cause damage or injury, while high voltage is more dangerous. While low voltage is generally safe, some safety measures should still be taken. 

For example, when working with low voltage electrical wires, it is vital to ensure they are not damaged or exposed. High voltage electrical wires are even more dangerous; therefore, extra care must be taken when working with them. In addition to ensuring they are not damaged or exposed, it is essential to wear protective clothing and avoid coming into contact with them.

Cost

High voltage is more expensive to produce than low voltage. 

But the cost of low- and high-voltage cables can vary depending on the length and thickness of the cable. Low voltage cables are typically less expensive than high voltage cables, but they can't carry as much power. High voltage cables are usually more expensive and have much more energy. The cost of installation can also vary depending on the type of cable. 

Low voltage cables are typically easier to install than high voltage cables and therefore cost less.

Hazards and Arcs

When working with electricity, it's essential to be aware of the hazards that can exist. 

For example, low voltage systems are typically considered safe, but they can still pose a shock risk if not handled properly. On the other hand, high voltage systems can be much more dangerous and should always be treated with extreme caution. High voltage can cause hazards and arcs if not handled correctly. 

Arcing is a hazard that can occur when electrical current jumps from one conductor to another. This can happen due to gaps in the electrical path or when the voltage is too high for the system. 

Arcing can cause fires and explosions, so it's essential to be aware of the potential dangers.

Cables and Equipment

There are two main electrical cables and equipment types: low and high voltage. 

Low voltage cables and equipment are typically used for smaller electronic devices, such as phones and laptops. They are designed to carry a low current, which means they pose less of a risk of electrical shock.

High voltage cables and equipment, on the other hand, are typically used for large electronic devices, such as industrial machinery. They are designed to carry a high current, which poses a greater risk of electrical shock. However, high voltage cables and equipment are also more efficient at carrying electrical power long distances.

Where are high and low voltage used?

Where are high and low voltage used?

Now that you know the difference between high voltage and low voltage, let's look at where each type of electricity is used.

High Voltage

High voltage is usually used in industrial settings or for powering large devices. It can be found in:

  • Power plants

  • Substations

  • Factories

  • Large motors

  • Street lights

Low Voltage

Low voltage is typically used in electronic devices or appliances. It can be found in:

  • Computers

  • Televisions

  • Cell phones

  • Tablets

But, which one should you use?

The type of electricity you should use depends on your needs. 

High voltage is the way to go if you need to power large devices. But if you're only powering small devices, then low voltage may be a better option.

Regarding safety, low voltage is less dangerous than high voltage. However, both types of electricity can be hazardous if not handled correctly. That's why it's essential to have proper safety measures in place regardless of which type you're using.

High voltage is more expensive to produce than low voltage. So if cost is a factor, then low voltage may be the better choice.

To sum it up, here are the main differences between high voltage and low voltage:

  • High voltage has higher potential energy than low voltage.

  • Low voltage has lower potential energy than high voltage.

  • High voltage is typically used to power large devices, while low voltage is usually used to power smaller devices.

  • High voltage can be dangerous if not handled correctly, while low voltage is less dangerous.

  • Finally, high voltage is more expensive to produce than low voltage.

Conclusion

Now that you know the difference between high and low voltage, you can decide which is best for your needs. 

High voltage is the way to go if you need to power large devices. But if you're only powering small devices, then low voltage may be a better option. Just remember always to take proper safety precautions when working with electricity.

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